March is the Month of Brain Awareness
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Filed under Counseling News on 3/1/2011 by Author: Nichole Hall.

March is here already and Spring is just around the corner!!! Time changes this month (on the 13th) which should help to alleviate some of the symptoms of SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder) that we have been experiencing.

March also brings awareness to some other unique issues related to mental health, education and awareness.

With St. Patrick’s Day being in March we often think of “luck” and “the pot at the end of the rainbow”.  It is quite fitting that March 7-13 is designated as Problem Gambling Week.  Recent research shows that 2-3% of the United States population will have a gambling problem in any given year and many of these gamblers go first to their primary care providers complaining of stress-related problems such as migraines, insomnia, stomach ailments and cardiac distress.  Problem gamblers are at higher risk for depression, alcohol and drug abuse, and domestic violence (Retrieved from http://www.ncpgambling.org/files/public/NAPS07HealthAwareness.pdf).   See Counseling Services for more information.

 

March 7-13 is also National Sleep Awareness Week.  This is quite fitting due to the change to Daylight Savings Time in which we ‘spring forward’ and lose an hour of sleep.  Most of us regroup and adjust to that change within a few days or weeks. But for individuals who struggle with sleep disorders (insomnia, narcolepsy, sleep apnea, etc) their entire life can be disrupted and they can experience symptoms of physical and mental distress without appropriate diagnosis and treatment.   See http://stress.about.com/b/2009/03/06/happy-sleep-awareness-week.htm for more information or stop into Counseling Services for more resources.

 

March is also the month set aside for Brain Awareness.    As a PhD candidate my research is on Brain Injury Awareness, in particular the type of brain injuries that are being seen from repetitive concussions in contact sports.  These injuries not only impact players, but families and caregivers too. If you or someone that you know has experienced a brain injury, there is help and support. Contact Counseling Services.

 

PLEASE NOTE:  March will bring an all new re-vamped Counseling Information Board, located in Elson Hall outside of the LAC.  It will be both eye-catching, inspiring,  and informative. Keep watching and we’ll keep you updated on progress.




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