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Appalachian Treasures Gateway

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Resources by Subtopic area for History:

Home--General Resources for History:

--1939 WPA Tennessee History Archive

http://newdeal.feri.org/guides/tnguide/cont.htm

Full text of the Tennessee: a Guide to the State originally published by the WPA in 1939.The Guide is a history of Tennessee covering various topics including geography and geology, native peoples, early settlers, industry, commerce, agriculture, the TVA, and the arts.

--Appalachian Center Publications

http://www.uky.edu/RGS/AppalCenter/publis.htm

Full-text article by Ronald D. Eller entitled 'Harry Caudill and the Burden of Mountain Liberalism'.

--Appalachian Summit

http://appalachiansummit.tripod.com/

The site is a documentary history of the southern Appalachians. An e-mail address for the author is provided. Jerry Trivette (author) has been involved in research and study of the history of the Appalachian Summit area for 30 years. Only primary documents are used in this history and bibliographic citations are provided. The site includes the history and listings of resources.

--AppalachianPower.com

http://www.appalachianpower.com/

Founded in 2001 and sponsored by the Nicholas County Board of Education, Summersville, West Virginia and funded by a 21st Century grant. Seeks to provide "cultural transmission" (the handing-down of Appalachian tradition and spirit) to those who share the pride of their home country and to examine and inform the meaning of Appalachia's design to the outsider. Includes oral histories, interviews, news articles and full text of materials by Appalachian author James Branscome.

--Blacksmith in the Oil Patch

http://www.appaltree.net/aba/oilpatch.htm

This is a section of a larger site which deals with the history of Blacksmithing and the role it has played in the economy in West Virginia and it's surrounding states.

-- Bland County History Archives

http://www.bland.k12.va.us/bland/rocky/gap.html

Site contains transcripts of oral histories, cemetery catalog and scanned photo collection. Much of the work for the site is provided by students of the Rocky Gap High School. Site provides a good model for the development of locally based history collection and preservation.

--Council on Appalachian Women Collection 1958-1981:

http://cass.etsu.edu/ARCHIVES/afindaid/a101.html

Bibliographic guide to the papers of the Council on Appalachian women manuscripts housed in the East Tennessee State Archives of Appalachia collection.

--Economic Development Board [History Page for Johnson City, Jonesborough, and Washington County, Tennessee]

http://www.jcedb.org/history/index.php

A gateway site with links to resources for local history information and information about local historic sites. The site provides full text of “Chapter VI: The State of Franklin” from the History of Western North Carolina by John Preston Arthur, 1914, and a full text article by Robert McBride on the “Lost Counties of Tennessee.”

--Johnson’s Depot

http://www.johnsonsdepot.com/

Sponsored by the mysterious Johnson’s Associates, this idiosyncratic site contains lots of information about Johnson City history focusing on the city’s early history, the railroads that contributed to its growth, and current restoration projects. Also provided are information about the city’s contributions to county and Appalachian music, lots of photos and postcards, and answers to “Infrequently Asked Questions.”

--Lost Voices & The Appalachian Region

http://www.marshall.edu/orahist/appalachia.html

This is a portion of the Lost Voices site. It contains Oral histories reflecting contributions of black women to the state of West Virginia and a discussion of West Virginia as a region within Appalachia.

--Manuscript Sources for Women's History Research in the Special Collections Department of the Virginia Tech Libraries

http://spec.lib.vt.edu/women/wmnunidx.htm

A guide to the collections of primary materials including materials for women's history research held by the Special Collections Department of the University Libraries at Virginia Tech. Descriptions of the materials held in the collections provided.

--Matewan

http://www.matewan.com/

This town maintained web site provides details on the infamous Battle of Matewan, the legendary tales of the Hatfield's and McCoy's Feud, the devastating floods of the Tug Valley, as well as current information geared to the local citizens of the Tug Valley area.

-- New River Notes

http://www.newrivernotes.com/

Created by Jeffery C. Weaver as a history resource page for the Upper New River Valley of North Carolina and Virginia (Ashe, Alleghany, Watagua and Wilks Counties, North Carolina and Grayson County, Southwest Virginia), this site includes full-text primary materials and links to sites containing primary data and resources.

--Slavery and Emancipation in the Mountain South

http://scholar.lib.vt.edu/faculty_archives/mountain_slavery/

Companion website for two books about slavery that flourished amidst a non-slaveholding majority and a large surplus of poor white landless laborers in Southern Appalachia.

--Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture

http://tennesseeencyclopedia.net/

Searchable, full-text online version of the 1998 print encyclopedia about this Appalachian state. Includes updates. Coverage emphasizes history, social customs, contemporary attractions, and famous citizens. Most entries include suggestions for further reading.

-- West Virgina River Trek

http://www.technobeat.com/WV/Trek.html

An Anecdotal description of a tour to take in various mounds in West Virginia by Bob Tarte, writer for the Technobeat column for the Beat magazine. Article contains a lengthy section about the Hatfields and McCoy's feud.

--Wikipedia: Appalachia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Appalachia

Encyclopedia entry for Appalachia in Wikipedia. Provides overview and links to related entries. Includes a map of the region, brief description of the culture, description of the Appalachian Region Commission, and list of popular portrayals of Appalachian life and peoples. Additional links include Appalachian folk music, Appalachian English, Melungeons, and Ozark culture.